I ran the Casper Wyoming marathon one year.    It was a beautiful marathon on a nice warm spring day. 


Everything went well until the end.  


The race spends several miles running on paved trails similar to the Jordan river Parkway, especially near the end, or at least it was the year I ran it.  There are lots of curves in the trail.  The mile 26 marker went by, I couldn’t see the finish line from there.  Then the trail curved, and came up to a street.  Based on the curve of the trail and a very inattentive volunteer stationed there, I started running down the street instead of crossing it into the finish area.   I got 40 or 50 yards down the street before I figured out I was suddenly alone.  I turned back around, and being from out of state and not familiar with the course, I got disoriented. 


I got back on the paved trail and started running, expecting to see the finish line appear any second.  Instead of seeing the finish line, I saw the mile 26 marker again, only it was facing the wrong way.  Figuring out I was running the wrong direction, I turned around, then ended up back at the same corner again. 


I always use music when I run marathons, usually in both ears.  Being very frustrated by now, I shouted at the inattentive volunteer asking where I was supposed to go.  But then I couldn’t hear what he said because of the headphones.   Then someone else ran by, so I saw where the finish line was, less than 30 yards away.  


It’s probably good I never heard what the volunteer said back to me. 



#FridayswithFrank #DusktoDawnRelay #SeizetheNight




Frank has run 103 marathons and 3 ultras. He considers any exercise that is not running to be a waste of time. His running music of choice is Nightwish, though he is also a huge fan of Cher. Frank currently lives with his wife in West Jordan, Utah.



Race Directors Note: Frank is a good personal friend that I have known for many years. We currently run together on a weekly basis, and I have run several marathons with him. Through these many interactions I have heard many of the stories that we are sharing on this blog, and I thought it was about time for the rest of the world to hear them. So I hope you all enjoy Fridays with Frank.

-Andrew

3 views0 comments

On Christmas morning several years back, my dad and I got up at 7:15 in single-digit temperatures to go running.

Then we got up on New Year's Day at 7:45 and went for a run.


Most people would question the conventionality of running both of these mornings (especially Christmas), and I would forthrightly agree. I had never run on Christmas morning either....but it was great!!

I start this post by talking about running because, well, I simply want to talk about running. Out of all conversation topics, running is one of my favorites. However, I understand that many people don't like running, let alone talking or even thinking about running, so I will not bore you with extended prose concerning stride length or VO2 capacity.

I would simply like to talk about time; specifically, the principles of time that have been made clear to me through running.

1) Time is relative.

For someone doing a long run (20 miles) on a Saturday morning, time seems to expand. The 3 or so hours it takes to run 20 miles seems to be not 3 hours, but double that. Consider someone sleeping for an additional 3 hours - they would experience no such expansion of their time; I'd wager they would even feel a decrease of time within those same 3 hours. So, although 3 hours is 3 hours no matter how you spend it, when involved in something with purpose, 3 hours can seem like a lot more.

2) Time matters. 

This past year I had the goal to qualify for the Boston Marathon. In order to do that, I had to run a 3:05 marathon or faster--my qualification wasn't based on the place I took or how well I personally did, but a certain time in which I ran the marathon. In my training runs, I had to keep track of my mile pace so I would be able to accomplish my goal--I had to run at least a 7 minute mile for 26.2 miles in order to reach it. So during my training runs until race day, every single second was counted, and it mattered.

Oh and by the way, I did accomplish my goal. :) Boston Marathon 2016 was great! Now on to qualify for Boston 2020! Fingers crossed...

3) Time, when scheduled correctly, can be used to your advantage.

Okay, so this is basically the same principle as time being relative. But, I had some additional experiences with this that will hopefully clarify this point more. When I was training to qualify for the Boston Marathon (see previous paragraph), I was also going to college full-time. And I had a job. And people kept pestering me about dating, so I did that a few times. ;) Needless, to say, I felt like I had run out of time in my day. However, I noticed something interesting during the semester. On the days when I decided to not run, I seemed to get less done; on the other hand, on the days when I scheduled a run, I got more done. It was a strange phenomenon. I realized that on the days I went running I scheduled my time better and was more effective. I rarely planned my day on the days I didn't run, consequently squandering my time.

When I ran, I didn't run out of time; and when I ran out of time, I would run to get it back.

4) Time used in the future is best spent when we review the past.

I wrote a blog post once about not living in the past and how we should live in the present. A stipulation I presented, however, was that we should remember the past inasmuch as it inspires us toward good in the present and future. In May 2014 I ran the Ogden Marathon. It was my first marathon upon my return from an LDS mission, and I had high hopes to run a 3-hour marathon. I didn't make it - I ran it in 3:09.55. It was a brutal race for me, and at about mile 19 (with 7 miles left to run, mind you) I slowed down and began to lose hope. The downhill was too hard, my legs hurt, I hated running, and I just couldn't do it. The weeks and months that proceeded that race allowed me the chance to reflect on what went wrong during that race, and what I could have done better. For instance, I started the race running way too fast; I also didn't run enough miles before the race, so I got tired sooner than I had hoped.

Looking back allowed me to improve my performance in the future, so that my hopes of a sub-3-hour marathon were eventually accomplished.


So there you have a list of 4 things I learned about time while running. Just a bunch of words, right? WRONG!! Or at least, they're not meant to be. How can you apply these principles of time to your life? It's still a new year--year 2019--and we have so many possibilities ahead of us. It's up to us to seize those opportunities and make the best out of the time we're allotted.

Just some statistics.

There are:

  • 12 months in a year

  • 52 weeks in a year

  • 365 days in a year

  • 8,766 hours in a year

  • 525,960 minutes in a year

  • 31,557,600 seconds in a year

How will you use your time this year?

#DusktoDawnRelays #SeizetheNight #Running #Time #Mindfulness #UtahRelayRace

18 views0 comments

In 2009, I ran a northern Utah marathon, and failed to remember to NOT take my high blood pressure pill on race morning.  During the ride to the start, I heard the driver ask us “so, do I wait here until you finish”?  Someone told him No. 


At the end of the race I felt awful, and the medics quickly invited me into the medic tent.   For some reason, I was extremely cold, shivering visibly in my wet clothes despite having a blanket on.   I heard one of the other medics walk in and say “what’s the matter with him”?  They had taken my temperature with the devices which scans in an ear several times, and were confused by the readings, as they weren’t very low. 

The cold and shivering persisted, so finally one of the medics said to me “Here, these girls will hold up these blankets. We need to get your clothes off”.  After that, I heard another runner say “I passed out 100 yards before the finish line, do you think they’re going to disqualify me”?  I didn’t hear anyone’s response to him.  



After a little more time, I was still cold.   The nurse came back again and said “we need to take your core temperature”.  Thinking it would be an actual thermometer under my tongue, I said OK.   Then I learned what “taking your core temperature” really meant.   When I got out of there, the doctor said “don’t ever take your high blood pressure medicine on race morning again. 


I haven’t since.



#FridayswithFrank #DusktoDawnRelay #SeizetheNight




Frank has run 103 marathons and 3 ultras. He considers any exercise that is not running to be a waste of time. His running music of choice is Nightwish, though he is also a huge fan of Cher. Frank currently lives with his wife in West Jordan, Utah.



Race Directors Note: Frank is a good personal friend that I have known for many years. We currently run together on a weekly basis, and I have run several marathons with him. Through these many interactions I have heard many of the stories that we are sharing on this blog, and I thought it was about time for the rest of the world to hear them. So I hope you all enjoy Fridays with Frank.

-Andrew

12 views0 comments